What is Geospatial technology?

Geospatial Technology is a fast-growing field that spans science, industry, defense, and academia. This discipline collects, processes, analyzes, maps, and deploys geolocated information – also called geospatial data – to fuel Global Positioning System (GPS) navigation and tracking, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) mapping and analysis, Activity-Based Intelligence (ABI) predictive analysis, automated Location-Based Services (LBS) software, and a range of related technologies.

Geospatial software tools, Like SOCET GXP™, enable the analysis, fusion and exploitation of geospatial information into actionable intelligence, giving our policy makers, intelligence analysts, warfighters, and emergency responders timely and accurate information so they can adapt and respond more effectively  to emerging situations.

By leveraging geographic data, cartography, spatial analysis, remote sensing, satellite imagery, and machine learning in relation to human activities, societal currents, and natural events, geospatial technologies expand, optimize, and support specified capabilities in ways that transform business, defense, medicine, space exploration, transportation, communication, geology, sociology, education, and more areas that impact the daily lives of people worldwide.

Uses and applications of geospatial technology continue to grow, and they vary widely, but a few examples from different economic sectors include:

  • Smart Devices – phones, security systems, TVs, medical wearables, thermostats, lighting, VR headsets, safety controls, etc. – all use geospatial technology, leveraging intelligence that empowers apps and controls designed to make life and business easier, safer, more convenient, and efficient.
  • In the Defense Community, geospatial technology empowers electronic warfare (EW) systems that protect aircraft, ground vehicles, ships, bases, and warfighters. It also drives sensors, satellites, radar arrays, mapping systems, and more to monitor and assess geopolitics and predict potential threats.
  • Emergency Management systems employ geospatial technology to plan for natural disasters and human-caused hazards, track changing conditions that may affect outcomes, alert staff and response teams as situations arise, and provide information, guidance, and functions designed to save lives and contain damage.

Transit Systems use geospatial technology in control systems to integrate multiple modes of transport efficiently and dependably, in vehicle propulsion systems that increase mileage and useful life while lowering emissions, and in security systems that contain crime and protect equipment.

 


This information page is provided as a service to our readers by BAE Systems, Inc., a U.S.-based world leader in aerospace, defense, power, and intelligence solutions. Learn more about us here.