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Women in Engineering

Felicity, Head of Engineering Performance

Felicity Fashade, Head of Engineering Performance
Felicity Fashade has nearly 20 years’ experience in the engineering industry.
Felicity joined BAE Systems in October 2015 as Head of Engineering Performance in the Company’s Maritime Naval Ships business. She is responsible for defining, leading and implementing strategies and frameworks in the areas of operations, people, strategic forecasting and tools/infrastructure. Her primary mission in this role is to build and sustain a high performance culture for the whole of Naval Ships Combat Systems, focussing on assessing, developing and sustaining the engineering and resource capability across all integrated project teams (IPTs).  
 
It was Felicity’s Physics teacher at secondary school that inspired her from a young age. His passion for space exploration sparked off her enthusiasm for science and technology and this interest steered her education towards a career in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths).
 
Felicity said: “At school I was one of the team members who participated in the radio communications with Helen Sharman, our first British astronaut while she was in space. My passion for space, science and technology grew stronger every day since.”
Graduating with a BEng Hons degree in Electrical and Electronic Engineering from Brunel University in 1997 and since completing a Master’s in Business Administration (MBA) in 2005 from Loughborough University, Felicity has had a long and varied career.
 
Felicity spent the early part of her career at MBDA, working as a Guidance and Control Engineer and Senior Systems Engineer amongst other positions. During this time Felicity worked on exciting projects like the Principal Anti Air Missile System (PAAMS) weapons programme for the Type 45 Destroyer and the Advanced Short Range Anti Air Missile (ASRAAM). 
 
In 2008, Felicity joined Raytheon UK as a Senior Business Analyst to work on a complex large-scale Information Technology Project. She held a number of other key positions including Conceptual Design Functional Lead for the Alert Management Systems (AMS) and Software Release and Build Manager.
 
Since 2011, Felicity moved into engineering functional management, primarily responsible for defining and tracking functional goals and strategies for the engineering function.
 
In 2012, she was appointed to lead the systems engineering discipline, responsible for defining and implementing people, tools and process strategy for this discipline, in order to maximise productivity and performance across different programmes. Felicity was also proud to lead the development of Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) methodology to support large scale software development, which was successfully delivered to a wider network of professional engineers as part of the annual INCOSE event.
 
Today, this career move is relevant in Felicity’s current role, where she assesses, develops and sustains the engineering and resource capability to meet business deliverables and works to improve the infrastructure of STEM outreach and tools.
 
Felicity routinely delivers talks and lectures in many external local and national events to promote engineering as a career for young people. In April 2014, she was the keynote speaker for the annual Ballantyne Lecture at the Royal Aeronautical Society (RAeS) and has delivered other engineering lectures at Cambridge University and the @Bristol Science Museum.
 
Commenting on her career, Felicity said: “I have worked in multi-disciplined teams in the engineering industry across different sectors for nearly 20 years, and I’ve never had a dull moment in my career. Every piece of work I have undertaken is meaningful and rewarding and I continue to be inspired by all the engineers I work with. Their immerse range of talent and enthusiasm in their chosen fields have kept me going every day. I am always excited to see new products and witness how a team of engineers coming together can achieve great things, things they might never have imagined.”