Vickers No 5
Monoplane

A Vickers School monoplane with significant changes from the earlier REP-derived designs.
Vickers No 5 monoplane stbd The Vickers No 5 monoplane taxying at Brooklands.
 
The Vickers No.5 Monoplane was the last Vickers monoplane to make use of the Vickers REP engine, all other major components having been changed away from those of the original REP design. For instance, the undercarriage had been changed from the outset on the Vickers Monoplane No.1 whilst the details of the fuselage structural joints were changed on Vickers Monoplane No.3, which also featured a modified forward fuselage structure, and a new wing planform.
 
On the Vickers Monoplane No.5, the fuselage was of rectangular cross-section from nose to tail, with a significant increase in the depth of the fuselage, below the pilots’ cockpits. The modified fuselage gave better protection to its occupants and finished in a horizontal knife edge, rather than the vertical knife edge on Vickers Monoplane Nos. 1 to 4. The fin on Vickers Monoplane No.5 was shorter, with a well-rounded rudder and the ‘cabane’ roll-over structure was also further strengthened within the design.
 
The Vickers No.5 Monoplane was built at Erith, Kent before being transferred to join the Vickers’ School at Brooklands in May 1912, where it continued in use until April 1914.
 
Its designer AR Low commented on the aircraft’s flight characteristics as '… an independent pilot took No.5 out on his own, and told me that it climbed well, flew in steady fore and aft trim and glided well, but was sensitive to side gusts. I told him to wash-out the wings with less camber, after which it was much more controllable'.
 
Vickers No 5 monoplane in flight The No 5 monoplane in flight at Brooklands showing the deeper fuselage of this aircraft.
 

Variants & Numbers


One only, in use from May 1912 until April 1914.

 

Specification


Powerplant
One 60 hp Vickers-REP semi-radial engine
Span
38 ft 6 in
Maximum Weight
Not known
Capacity
Pilot and passenger
Maximum Speed
Not known
 

Survivors


There are no surviving examples of this type.

 

Other information