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Continuous 
At Sea Deterrent

CASD50
This year marks the 50th anniversary of Continuous At Sea Deterrent - CASD50 - the longest unbroken operation ever delivered by the UK. It is known as Operation Relentless.
For five decades we have worked side-by-side with the Royal Navy to help keep our nation safe. At BAE Systems, we are proud of our heritage in manufacturing and engineering excellence, of our role in delivering the world’s most advanced and complex defence programmes and of the dedication, passion and innovation of our people.
 
Today, we remain as proud to work alongside the Royal Navy in defending our nation as we design, build and deliver the next class of deterrent submarines – Dreadnought. Over the next five weeks we will be shining the spotlight on our heritage, our people, our use of technology, our contribution to the UK and the future of our business.
 

This is our story.

 

 

Our Contribution to the UK

 

3: Pride in our role

 
Our role in 50 years of CASD

 
The Defence Secretary has paid tribute to the "continued hard work" of our people in continuing to preserve national security over 50 years of Continuous At Sea Deterrent.
 
Penny Mordaunt has written to thank the thousands of people working at our Submarines sites in Barrow and across the UK for their continuing contribition to supporting the Royal Navy on Operation Relentless, including all those who have played their part over the past five decades.
 
Every single man and woman who works at BAE Systems in Barrow makes a vital contribution to our national security by helping to maintain our nuclear deterrent every day.

Defence Secretary Penny Mordaunt

 
She said: “Every day for the past 50 years we have had a submarine continuously patrolling our waters and at this important milestone it’s important to recognise everyone who has played a pivotal role in this, including the thousands of shipyard workers in Barrow-in-Furness.

“The region has a long and proud history of shipbuilding, with hundreds of merchant ships, submarines and naval vessels all built in Barrow’s shipyards.
 
“Every single man and woman who works at BAE Systems in Barrow makes a vital contribution to our national security by helping to maintain our nuclear deterrent every day. And as Defence Secretary I would like to thank them for their continued hard work.”
 

Click the video to hear Steve Lloyd, Dreadnought Programme Director for BAE Systems Submarines, talk about how our business is continuing to play its part in supporting CASD and the Royal Navy.

 

 

2: A true visionary

 
Barrow-in Furness
 
James Ramsden may have been born more than 100 miles from Barrow-in-Furness, but he saw potential from day one.

The industrialist, born in Bolton, Lancashire, saw past Barrow as the sleepy fishing port it was in the late 1840s. When he arrived in the town he was met with a population who had hard work in their blood. And it was he, decades later, who founded the Iron Ship Building Company – the firm which would soon change its name to Barrow Shipbuilding Company. It was the start of a dynasty that has led ultimately to our modern day operations, working in partnership with the Royal Navy to deliver today and tomorrow's world-leading platforms and programmes.

By the time the Barrow Shipbuilding Company had been formed, Ramsden had served five successive terms as Mayor of Barrow and had led it to achieving Municipal status in 1867. 

James RamsdenThe proximity of the foundry at the Barrow Hematite Steel Company (pictured above), of which Ramsden had become Managing Director in 1866, made the production of steel-clad warships extremely economical and it was Ramsden's vision that saw the huge potential of a joint venture which became the Barrow Shipbuilding Company.
 
During 1888, Barrow Shipbuilding Company was taken over by its sister company, the Naval Construction and Armaments Company in order to create a single source of armed naval vessels.  It would also allow them to secure the patents for submarine torpedo boats, two of which had already been built at Barrow by Nordenfelt during 1886/87.
 
Numerous naval vessels were completed under the new name including HMS Juno, an Eclipse Class Cruiser laid down in 1894.
 
During this period of technical revolution within heavy industry, Maxim-Nordenfelt Guns and Ammunition Company had also operated at Barrow and it was inevitable that they would join forces with the shipbuilding companies.
 
Barrow-in Furness
 

 

1: Supporting our community

 

Central Yard Complex, Barrow-in-Furness

 

From the earliest days of our site at Barrow, BAE Systems and our predecessors have made a significant contribution to the economy of the town and the wider south Cumbria area of the UK.

The challenge presented by Dreadnought and its associated ramp-up has meant an increase in investment in the site, our people and our future talent pipeline to ensure we deliver what is needed for the Royal Navy.
 
There are already more than 1,800 people working on the Dreadnought programme. There are 7,100-plus full time basis staff employed on programmes across our Barrow site in total (supporting some 9,600 full time equivalent jobs in South Cumbria - one in every 20 full time equivalent jobs in the region, according to research by Oxford Economics). It is estimated that for every 10 full time equivalent jobs within our business, 14 are supported in the south Cumbria area as a whole.
 
By 2020 between 5,000 and 6,000 BAE Systems staff will be working on the Dreadnought programme alone. Accordingly, we have made a significant investment in the site’s facilities, local education and skills to prepare and ensure we can deliver.
 
New facilities, built to support the programme, have opened in recent years. In total, 24 projects have been planned as part of a multi-million pound site investment which will ensure Barrow can meet the challenges presented by the project.
 
The £90m Central Yard Complex (CYC), opened in 2017, is the biggest of the new builds. Rivalling the Devonshire Dock Complex in size, 28 miles of piling, supporting 4,560 tonnes of steel frame, went into the build. It offers an advanced facility created to fit out each section of new submarines before they are transported to the Devonshire Dock Hall to be completed.
 
Additional investments include the opening in 2019 of Europe's newest coatings facility on the Barrow site. The facility will coat some of the UK's most advanced and largest projects over the coming years. The £45m Central Coatings Facility (CCF) is made up of four cells, able to accommodate complex pieces of engineering of all shapes and sizes.
 
Building for the future: Construction of the Central Yard Complex

of

Central Yard Complex, Barrow-in-Furness
Central Yard Complex, Barrow-in-Furness

The images on this site are the property of BAE Systems (Copyright © 2019 BAE Systems. All rights reserved)
Central Yard Complex, Barrow-in-Furness
Central Yard Complex, Barrow-in-Furness

The images on this site are the property of BAE Systems (Copyright © 2019 BAE Systems. All rights reserved)
Central Yard Complex, Barrow-in-Furness
Central Yard Complex, Barrow-in-Furness

The images on this site are the property of BAE Systems (Copyright © 2019 BAE Systems. All rights reserved)
Central Yard Complex, Barrow-in-Furness
Central Yard Complex, Barrow-in-Furness

The images on this site are the property of BAE Systems (Copyright © 2019 BAE Systems. All rights reserved)
Central Yard Complex, Barrow-in-Furness
Building work on the Central Yard Complex at Barrow-in-Furness

The images on this site are the property of BAE Systems (Copyright © 2019 BAE Systems. All rights reserved)
 

 

Defence Secretary praises 50 years of service as new submarine is named

 

Dreadnought

 

 

The Defence Secretary has announced the fourth Dreadnought submarine as HMS King George VI ahead of a special service at Westminster Abbey on May 3 to recognise the Royal Navy’s Continuous at Sea Deterrent (CASD) over the past 50 years.

Since April 1969, a Royal Navy ballistic missile submarine has patrolled every single day, without interruption, providing the nation’s deterrent and helping keep the UK and our allies safe. This is the UK’s longest sustained military operation ever undertaken and is known as Operation Relentless.

Defence Secretary Penny Mordaunt said: “Operation Relentless has seen generations of submariners from HMS Resolution to HMS Vengeance on constant watch, for every minute of every day for the last five decades. This is the longest military operation we have ever undertaken and continues right this minute deep under the sea. 

“We pay tribute to those incredible crews, their supportive families, the Royal Navy and the thousands of industry experts who will continue to sustain this truly national endeavour for many years to come.”

CASD50 provides a chance to not only remember the national endeavour of the past half century but to look to the next-generation of ballistic missile submarines, the Dreadnought class. This will consist of four boats helping to ensure the security of generations to come. The Dreadnought-class are expected to enter service in the early 2030s, helping to maintain Operation Relentless.

 


 
The Vanguard class will be replaced from 2028

 


 
HMS Resolution

Week 1: Our heritage

08-10 May 2019
Find out more
Image taken from the outside of the facility

Week 2: Our skills

13-17 May 2019
Find out more