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Vickers Supermarine

Manufacturers of probably the most famous fighter aircraft in the world.

 Vickers Supermarine

Supermarine Logo
Supermarine actually has its origins in Pemberton-Billing Limited who were based at Woolston, Southampton in 1913 and who used the term ‘Supermarine Southampton’ as its telegram and cable address.  
 
In 1916, Sales Manager Hubert Scott-Paine purchased Pemberton Billing Ltd, changing its name to Supermarine Aviation Works Limited.
 
 
The first true ‘Supermarine’ design was the Nighthawk, an anti-Zepplin fighter aircraft although the design never progressed past the prototype stage.  The Nighthawk proved totally inadequate for the role, being too slow in the climb (taking an hour to climb to 10,000ft!) and it was abandoned soon after its first flight in 1917.  
 
Supermarine entry for the Admiralty Amphibian Competition in 1920
Supermarine entry for the Admiralty Amphibian Competition in 1920
 
A number of seaplane projects followed under Chief Designer RJ Mitchell, who joined the company in 1919 and a year later Supermarine entered the Commercial Amphibian for the Admiralty Amphibian Competition at Matlesham Heath, said to be Mitchells first true design for the company. 
 
Gradually the company turned its attention to the design and production of racing aircraft and in particular the Sea Lion with which it competed for the 1919 Schneider Trophy at Bournemouth.  
 
The race ended in chaos after it was abandoned due to fog with the aircraft being damaged by flotsam.  In 1922 Supermarine finally scored their first Schneider Trophy win with a Sea Lion Mk2 and various radical designs followed, a number created to contest government held competitions. 
 
In addition to racing activities, the company secured orders from the newly-formed Fleet Air Arm with one of their most successful aircraft between the wars being the Southampton Flying boat of which 83 were built in between 1924 and 1934.
 
Meanwhile, Mitchell still had a passion for speed and the sleek lines of the S.6B, built for the Schneider Trophy Race of 1931, showed echoes of what was to be his most famous design of all – The Supermarine Spitfire.  
 
Less glamorous but almost as significant in operational terms was Mitchell’s Supermarine Walrus, a catapult-launched amphibian fleet spotter of which 740 aircraft were built from 1933.
Vickers Supermarine Experimental Aircraft Hangar at Hursley Park
The Experimental Hangar,Hursley Park 
 
The story of Supermarine is rarely told without reference to the Spitfire however, an aircraft which achieved iconic status around the world and is still loved today.  
 
Designed at Hursley Park near Winchester, over 20,000 aircraft were built over in distinct marks (many then had variations of engine, wing and propeller within those marks).
 
The jet age saw Supermarine Aviation have little success with a number of unfulfilled projects and their last true aircraft was the Scimitar in 1956.
 
Eventually the Supermarine brand was consumed by Vickers-Armstrongs (Aircraft) as it became part of British Aircraft Corporation.

Genealogy

1913    Pemberton-Billing Limited
 1916   Supermarine Aviation Works Limited                                                     
 1928  Vickers Aviation Limited
1954 Vickers-Armstrongs (Aircraft) Limited                                                                        
1960 British Aircraft Corporation
1973 British Aerospace
1999 BAE Systems

Aircraft

1916
AD Flying Boat
1929
 S.6
1916
AD Navyplane
1931
 S.6B
1917
 Nighthawk
1931
 Air Yacht
1917
 Baby
1931
 Type 179
1919
 Sea Lion I
1932
 Scapa
1919
 Channel
1932
 Stranraer
1920
 Commercial Amphibian
1933
 Walrus
1920
 Sea King
1934
 Type 224
1921
 Seagull
1936
 Spitfire
1921
 Seal
1938 
 Sea Otter
1922
 Sea Lion II and III
1939
 322 also S.24/37 or "Dumbo"
1922
 Scylla
1941
 Seafire
1922
 Sea Urchin
1944
 Spiteful
1923
 Sea Eagle
1946
 Seafang
1924
 Scarab
1946
 Attacker
1924
 Swan
1948
 Seagull ASR-1
1924
 Sparrow
1948
 510
1925
 Southampton
1950
 535
1925
 S.4
1950
 521
1927
 Sheldrake
1951
 Swift
1927
 S.5
1951
 508
1927
 Nanok
1954
 525
1927
 Solent
1956
 Scimitar
1928
 Seamew
 
 

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