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York pupil crowned runner up UK young engineer of the year at the national science + engineering competition finals

Big Bang winner
A talented pupil from Fulford Secondary School, York has been crowned Runner-Up UK Young Engineer of the Year after coming second in the finals of the UK’s prestigious National Science + Engineering Competition.

Harry Raley was announced as the Runner-Up with his brilliant project, which saw him design and build his own 3D printer.
 
Harry’s brother and fellow Fulford Secondary School pupil Charlie Raley also found success, winning the BAE Systems Inspired Work Prize for his project which saw him design and produce his own remote controlled helicopter with live video feed.
 
The results were announced at The Big Bang UK Young Scientists & Engineers Fair – the UK’s largest celebration of science and engineering for young people, at The NEC, Birmingham. At the Fair, Harry and Charlie’s shortlisted entries were showcased to over 75,000 visitors and they came face-to-face with top celebrity judges in a Dragons’ Den style pitch process.
 
By being awarded the title of Runner-Up UK Young Engineer of the Year and the BAE Systems Inspired Work Prize, the brothers have put North Yorkshire on the map as a region of rising young talent after their triumph in the National Science + Engineering Competition. As part of his prize, Harry received £700, a medal and a certificate and Charlie won £500 and an experience prize.
 
Harry said: “I just wanted to be able to make something from scratch. Making a 3D printer was the natural progression of what I’d already done and was a challenge. I thought I had the ability to do it, and I had the equipment, so I thought: why not?
 
“I’ve made five or six 3D printers before, but the overall process of tinkering around and making a printer that is reliable has taken about two or three months. I’ve been working on it after I get home from work in the evenings. The building process didn’t actually take too long – it was more thinking about the process and the best way to create the machine.
 
“I would always tell people to never have any limitations to what they think is impossible and that actually nothing is impossible. There’s always a way around it. If you think you can do it, you must be able to”.
 
Clive Kelsall, Engineering Manager at BAE Systems commented on Charlie’s award of the Inspired Work Prize:
 
“The work showcased by Charlie at this year’s National Science+ Engineering Competition was fantastic and an inspiration to all who saw it. The innovative project delivered by Charlie not only achieved superb results but also proved to be both influential and motivational to others. Well done Charlie and we hope you enjoy your VIP day out at the Farnborough International Air Show in July.”
 
Imran Khan, Chief Executive of the British Science Association which runs the National Science + Engineering Competition, commented:
 
“We’re thrilled that Harry and Charlie have been awarded these prestigious honours at The Big Bang Fair this year. Their projects really caught our imagination and we hope that they inspire other young people to enter the Competition.
 
“Now in its sixth year, our contest has become renowned for recognising, rewarding and inspiring thousands of talented youngsters in all areas of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. We need to nurture a new generation of bright sparks, and the competition offers a great incentive to get youngsters experimenting and having fun with science and engineering.”
 
The National Science + Engineering Competition is an annual contestopen to pupils aged between 11-18, and gives participants the chance to compete for top prizes and international experiences worth over £50,000. Visit www.nsecuk.org for more information about next year’s competition, which is now open.